Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking
Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace - Norse American Viking

Viking Gungnir Raven Stainless Steel Pendant Necklace

Regular price $24.99 Save $-24.99
21 in stock

This Viking pendant necklace features the Gungnir, Odin's spear, and Hugin and Munin, Odin's ravens.

Pendant height 1 7/8"
Pendant width 1 1/4"
Pendant weight 0.70 ounces
Necklace length is 23 1/2"
All pendant necklaces come with a stainless steel chain.

Gungnir, "Swaying" in Old Norse, is Odin's spear. Depictions of Odin holding  Gungnir dates back to the Bronze Age and the oldest written literature is by Bragi Boddason from the early 800's where he calls Odin "Gungnis Vafadr" (Gungnir's shaker). Gungnir was crafted by black elves, Svartálfar in Old Norse, who were the sons of Ivaldi. Gungnir has a special power that nothing will stop it from hitting its target.

Hugin and Munin (pronounced "HOO-gin" and "MOO-nin"; Old Norse Huginn and Muninn, are two ravens who help the god Odin.

Ravens were of great significance to the Vikings and revered as a sign from the Gods when they appeared. Odin had two ravens named Hugin and Munin (Old Norse Huginn and Muninn) The names come from the words hugr and munr which translates to "Thought" and "Memory"

Two ravens sit on his (Odin's) shoulders and whisper all the news which they see and hear into his ear; they are called Huginn and Muninn. He sends them out in the morning to fly around the whole world, and by breakfast they are back again. Thus, he finds out many new things and this is why he is called 'raven-god' (hrafnaguð).

From the Poetic Edda in the poem Grímnismál, Odin says:

Hugin and Munin
Fly every day
Over all the world;
I worry for Hugin
That he might not return,
But I worry more for Munin.